Let’s Talk About Our Failures

[This short article was prompted by responses to my thought-nugget on “The Value of Rags.” I pray that it will be a source of encouragement to those who are paralyzed by their past failures.—Samuel Koranteng-Pipim, PhD]   Introduction   It’s easy to talk about our successes and accomplish...

Thought Nuggets

THOUGHT NUGGETS Dr. Pipim's Inspirational Quotes    NOTE: 1. Below are the weekly thought-nuggets, beginning with the latest to the earliest. You are welcome to quote and share the nuggets, provided you source them to Samuel Koranteng-Pipim and reference these websites: http://drpipim.org/thou...

Zimbabwe: God's Open Doors

Described by the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation as “the first of its kind in Zimbabwe,” our “African Must Think” public lectures was held in Harare, the nation’s capital,on December 3 - 6, 2013.  The event was jointly hosted by our EAGLESonline team and the Catalytic Concepts Group of...

Attracting Youth To Church PDF  | Print |  E-mail
Honestly Mistaken
When presented with the truth, an honestly mistaken will either cease to be mistaken (if he loves truth) or cease to be honest (if he has no respect for truth). This section of drpipim.org will present the truth about some honestly mistaken ideas in the church. Keep checking up for more honestly mistaken notions.


Attracting Youth
It is an honestly mistaken assumption that the best way to attract and keep young people in the church is to adopt entertainment-oriented youth ministry programs—e.g., clowns, puppets, rock music, watered-down Bible messages, etc. This notion is, however, counteracted by an insightful article that appeared in TIME magazine (October 31, 2006) titled "In Touch With Jesus.” In that article, the author explains why "sugarcoated, MTV-style youth ministry is so over. Bible-based worship is packing teens in pews now." The author writes:

"Youth ministers have been on a long and frustrating quest of their own over the past two decades or so. Believing that a message wrapped in pop-culture packaging was the way to attract teens to their flocks, pastors watered down the religious content and boosted the entertainment. But in recent years churches have begun offering their young people a style of religious instruction grounded in Bible study and teachings about the doctrines of their denomination. Their conversion has been sparked by the recognition that sugarcoated Christianity, popular in the 1980s and early '90s, has caused growing numbers of kids to turn away not just from attending youth-fellowship activities but also from practicing their faith at all." (You can read the entire article on the website:
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1552027,00.html )


In our own church, the emergence of grassroots young peoples’ movements (such as GYC) offers compelling proof that serious young people prefer Bible-based, life-transforming, and mission-driven programs to the entertainment-approaches offered them by some adult youth leaders.

 
[For more on this, visit the GYC website (www.gycweb.org) and read "The Clarification Statement"]